Home Home Oral Health U.S. Lowers Recommended Fluoride Levels in Drinking Water

Denture Repairs

Denture Repair Same Day Done On Premises, Jupiter Florida, Dr. Mona Sims 561 747-7172

Dr. Mona Sims DDS

Caring for patients 25 years, same location in Jupiter, Florida for 15 years.

Have a question? Ask Dr. Sims






Advanced Dental Concepts of Jupiter
Dr. Mona Sims DDS

651 W Indiantown Rd Suite A Jupiter, FL 33458
(561) 747-7172

We have 231 guests online
Home Home Oral Health U.S. Lowers Recommended Fluoride Levels in Drinking Water
U.S. Lowers Recommended Fluoride Levels in Drinking Water
News - WebMD Oral Health
Jupiter, FL Dentist

U.S. Lowers Recommended Fluoride Levels in Drinking Water

Move is attempt to prevent teeth staining caused by overexposure to the mineral

WebMD News from HealthDay

By Dennis Thompson

HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, April 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. government has decreased its recommended level of fluoride in drinking water for the first time in a half-century, to prevent staining of tooth enamel caused by overexposure to fluoride.

The optimal fluoride level in drinking water to prevent tooth decay should be 0.7 milligrams of fluoride per liter of water, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced Monday.

The new level falls at the bottom end of the previously recommended fluoridation range of 0.7 to 1.2 milligrams per liter, which was issued in 1962.

Health experts recommended the change because Americans now have access to more sources of fluoride, including toothpaste and mouth rinses, than they did when municipal officials first began adding the mineral to water supplies across the United States, according to the HHS.

As a result, more people are exposed to too much fluoride and suffering from fluorosis -- white stains in the enamel of their teeth caused by too much fluoride.

Mild fluorosis takes the appearance of scattered white flecks, frosty edges or lacy chalk-like lines on teeth. The white spots become larger with severe fluorosis, and in extreme cases the surface of teeth become rough and pitted, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Federal health officials say the new recommended level will maintain the protective benefits of water fluoridation and reduce the occurrence of dental fluorosis.

"While additional sources of fluoride are more widely used than they were in 1962, the need for community water fluoridation still continues," said U.S. Deputy Surgeon General Rear Admiral Boris Lushniak. "Community water fluoridation continues to reduce tooth decay in children and adults beyond that provided by using only toothpaste and other fluoride-containing products."

About three out of every four Americans served by public water systems receive fluoridated water, the CDC says.

The decision to lower fluoride recommendations for drinking water is "not a big deal," said Dr. Ronald Burakoff, chair of dental medicine for North Shore-LIJ Health System in Manhasset, N.Y.

Gentle Dentistry With A Woman's Touch

WebMD

Read Full Article